top of page
  • Writer's pictureSam Wilks

Exploring the Relationship between Personality and Criminal Behaviour




The relationship between personality and criminal behaviour has been a topic of interest in the security industry and criminology for many years. Having spent decades in the security industry and over half a decade in training front-line personnel I wish to share my perspective on the relationship between personality and criminal behaviour.

Personality and Criminal Behaviour

I believe that there is a strong relationship between personality and criminal behaviour. In my observations, individuals who engage in criminal behaviour have certain personality traits that predispose them to engage in criminal acts. These personality traits include impulsivity, low self-control, and a lack of empathy.


Impulsivity refers to a tendency to act without thinking through the consequences of one's actions. Individuals who are high in impulsivity are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviour, including criminal acts. Low self-control refers to a lack of self-discipline and an inability to delay gratification. Individuals who are low in self-control are more likely to engage in criminal acts because they cannot resist the temptation to engage in such behaviour. A lack of empathy refers to a lack of concern for others and an inability to understand or feel the emotions of others. Individuals who lack empathy are more likely to engage in criminal acts because they do not feel the same sense of guilt or remorse that most people feel when they harm others. A lack of empathy affects their ability to regulate their behaviour around others.


These personality traits are not the sole cause of their criminal behaviour. Rather, they interact with environmental factors to increase the likelihood of criminal behaviour. For example, an individual who is high in impulsivity may be more likely to engage in criminal behaviour if they are exposed to drugs or alcohol. Similarly, an individual who is low in self-control may be more likely to engage in criminal behaviour if they are in a situation where they can easily obtain the object of their desire.

My Perspective on Criminal Justice

My perspective on criminal justice is based on my belief that criminal behaviour is primarily a result of individual choices and behaviours. Individuals who engage in criminal behaviour do so because they choose to do so, not because they are forced to do so by external factors such as poverty or lack of education.


I believe the criminal justice system should focus on deterring individuals from engaging in criminal behaviour rather than focusing on rehabilitating them after they have committed a crime. The threat of punishment is the most effective way to deter individuals from engaging in criminal behaviour. The criminal justice system should impose harsh penalties for criminal behaviour to send a strong message that such behaviour will not be tolerated.


The criminal justice system, in my opinion, should focus on preventing crime from occurring in the first place. The best way to prevent crime is to address the underlying causes of criminal behaviour, such as poverty and lack of education. By addressing these underlying causes, the criminal justice system could reduce the number of individuals who are at risk of engaging in criminal behaviour. I have not mentioned greater investment in mental health due to personal experience in the industry in a security role. Having worked in close vicinity to both carceral and voluntary clientele in the mental health industry, I have identified many who have been diagnosed by "Professionals' after on average a 15-minute interview, with severe mental health illness, to show much clearer signs of clustered personality disorders, and when provided discipline, routine and accountability measures, they are able to regulate their behaviour quite satisfactorily.

11 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page